Your shopping cart is empty.

Stephen Andrews: Aftermath

$48.00
hardcover, 272 pages
9x10 finished, three booklets adhered to a single case, essays, artwork plates and two flipbooks, printed in Canada

Publication to accompany Stephen Andrews:Aftermath, a major exhibition organized by the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, November 10th 2018 to February 18th 2019.

This unique publication accompanying the exhibition Stephen Andrews: Frames of War, sits at the intersection of exhibition catalogue and artist book, serving as a site for analysis and reinterpretation of Andrews' animations in the form of single frame flip books. Consider this a deconstructed book, with three 'booklets' with exposed sewn binding adhered to a single case. Conceptually, this approach reflects upon the artist's examination and reconstruction of mass media images. One 9x10 booklet will contain the writing, artwork plates and back matter, which will be adhered to the front cover, with the exposed binding facing out. Two other 'booklets' 5x9, with exposed sewn binding facing the spine, adhered to the back cover, will contain sequential stills approximately 30 second sections of two of the artists' video works.


ABOUT THE EXHIBITION
Coinciding with the exhibition David Milne: Modern Painting and the centenary of the Armistice, this exhibition will focus on Stephen Andrews' works responding to images of war and prisoners of war, exploring the way in which we experience such imagery through the media. Andrews' works, which are largely pencil crayon on paper, subtly interpret the omissions and misinterpretations of war imagery, with many images culled from unofficial soldiers' blogs and other online platforms. The bulk of the exhibition will feature the artist's work from 2003 through 2006, which deals primarily with the Iraq War. Andrews will also be showing a new work arising from his visit earlier this year to the Vimy Ridge Memorial in northern France. Like Milne, Andrews' war imagery focuses on the aftermath of conflict, and the problem of finding new formal means to convey the experience of looking. Not incidentally, Andrews has been a long-time admirer of the work of David Milne, walking in his footsteps with this cerebral, yet deeply felt work.

Customize your order

Last items looked at